Happy Earth Month!

Since day one, we have strived to find creative ways to give back to our community.  And starting today, we are going to share that with you!

Hagoyah’s non-profit organization of focus for April and May is Green Works KC.  Proceeds from our Tuesday & Thursday 12:00 Yoga classes go directly to this organization.

“If you are thinking a year ahead, sow a seed, If you are thinking ten years ahead, plant a tree. If you are thinking one hundred years ahead, educate the people.”

– Kuan Tzu  Chinese Poet, c. 500 B.C.

Green Works KC supports urban high school students through environmental education and workforce development. Using project-based learning, job skill training, service projects, internships, and other educational formats, GWKC prepares students for a sustainable, independent life after high school. They hope to inspire community and environmental activism, awareness, and respect through education and partnership.

Their primary curriculum focuses on Kansas City’s most pressing environmental problems including the combined sewer system, energy conservation and weatherization priorities, the declining urban forest, increasing ozone levels, and solid waste and recycling issues.

Green Works programming is long-lasting and over-arching. The core programs include a first year environmental education program, and a second year workforce development program, followed by paid summer internships.

During the 2017-2018 school year, ECOS classes will be held at at East High School, Northeast High School, and Hogan Prep High School. They also have two Excelerate programs at their midtown classroom.


The current Yoga Sutra focus for the Yoga Den is Asteya: non-stealing. In the context of Earth Month and Spring, it is fitting to take a look at the things we are consuming, buying, collecting, or using from this world. It can be material goods, environmental resources, energy, actions, thoughts, social media, or anything else that we may be “hoarding” or taking in out of a belief that we “lack” something—that “we are not enough” as we are, that we need something external—something additional to justify our being or affirm our experience.

Perhaps now is the time to evaluate the things you are bringing into your life. Are you “taking” things that might not be necessary? Can you live with less? What purpose do these things serve, and is your quality of life dependent upon having them? What is the impact of these actions and decisions on the earth, others around you, and the overall atmosphere or ecosystem in which you live?

A few ways to put this into practice:

What would it be like to experience contentment and abundance? Allow yourself to believe that you already are and have everything you want or need.

Educate yourself. Google can be really helpful for things like this! Look up simple “hacks” and solutions to minimize your consumption, reuse and recycle goods, and shake up your routine and habits. Or maybe getting off of electronics completely (or even for an hour or two) is a way to cut back? Fill your time with things that inspire you or give you a feeling of awe.

Participate in group or solo volunteer endeavors. There are tons of organizations in the area that need all sorts of skills and service. You don’t have to just serve food, pick up trash, donate money, or build houses. You can do administrative work, calls/canvassing, sorting/cleaning, physical work, read to kids, work with animals, help people become citizens, be a friend or mentor, participate in community action groups or committees—the possibilities really are limitless, you just have to look. The Public Library is a great start, as are volunteermatch.org and npconnect.org.

Get yourself into the community and connect. If something needs to change, it doesn’t take a giant world-shifting movement. We each individually hold so much power in our intentions and spirit. The person behind you in line at the store could need uplifting as much as anyone. So every action you take, all the energy you project, and especially how you take care of yourself, live out your own values, and treat others and our earth—are BIG steps to a more harmonious and healthy environment.

This is what we are all about cultivating at Hagoyah: inner beauty and wellness, treating people the way they deserve, creating a loving, peaceful, accepting, and joyful environment. This is why we want to engage our clients and our community in the things that mean the most to us. We hope to instill in all those who come through our doors the fact that they are enough—rather, MORE than enough—and we want to encourage everyone to spread it, believe it, and help others see it!

Yoga History

If you’ve never read into Yoga History, you may not be aware that the yoga we practice in the West is not the same as all
the yoga they practice in India. Or that many of the styles of yoga we practice come from a single lineage in a vast family tree of styles and philosophies. Or that our emphasis on our physical (asana) practice is relatively new, a modern interpretation of the ancient, sacred practice.

To begin exploring the evolution of yoga, we must begin around 5,000 years ago when yoga was first mentioned in the Vedas. These ancient texts are written in Sanskrit and are the oldest scriptures of Hinduism. These texts contain mantras, instructions and commentaries on rituals, and discussion on meditation, philosophy and spiritual knowledge.

The Upanishad texts continue to develop the ideas and practices in the Vedas, beginning a period called Pre-Classical Yoga. The Upanishads detail a six-fold path to liberation, which helped open up yoga to other religions and people outside Hinduism. This path includes breath control (pranayama), withdrawing the senses (pratyahara), meditation (dhyana), concentration (dharana), contemplative reflection (tarka) and finally the union with the divine (samahdi). The Upanishads provided a foundation for many important yoga texts including the Bhagavad Gita, a conversation between Krishna (the divine) and Prince Arjuna (mortal man). It is entirely devoted to discovering how one must live in order to have a truly yogic lifestyle. Prince Arjuna must embrace letting go of his ego and begin letting his actions speak for him. These principles later develop into three schools of yoga; Karma Yoga (generous actions), Bhakti Yoga (caring dedication) and Jnana Yoga (knowledge).

In the Classical Period, we begin to see our modern ideas of yoga really begin to take shape. Patanjali writes the Yoga Sutras, 195 aphorisms which guide us in our daily lives as well as in our yoga practice. Patanjali detailsan eight-fold path, developing the ideas of the Upanishad even further. They are ethical rules (yamas), behaviors (niyamas), physical postures (asanas), breath control (pranayama), withdrawl of senses (pratyahara), concentration (dharana), meditation (dhyana) and unity with the divine (samahdi). It’s worth noting here that Patanjali doesn’t detail any asanas in particular, but tells us only that the posture must be able to be held for a long time, staying relaxed, steady and motionless. If the posture causes pain or restlessness, it is not a yogic pose.

This brings us to the Post-Classical period, where the schools of Tantra and Hatha Yoga develop. Tantra focuses on expanding consciousness and liberating energies to transcend limitations. Hatha focuses on cleansing and balancing the body before progressing on to higher meditation. Around 130CE, the Hatha Yoga Pradipika is written, describing the ethical behavior of a yogi, 15 asanas (mostly variations of lotus pose), purification rituals, mudras, pranayama and meditation. The purpose of all of this is to prepare us to move into samahdi.

So where does this modern day “flow” yoga come from anyway? As it turns out, yoga as we know was heavily influenced by a system of Danish exercises called Primitive Gymnastics. These were the most popular form of exercise the world over by the 1920’s. Here’s where the single line of lineage begins to come into play.

T. Krishnamacharya was a well versed scholar of traditional Hindu philosophical systems as well as the ancient science of Ayurveda. However, he was also someone who was receptive to the needs of his day. He began creating a new dynamic asana practice combining some of the old traditions with the new modern take on exercise. His students loved it and they went on to create most of the styles that we practice in the West today. These included Krishnamacharya’s son TKV Desikachar (Viniyoga), TKV’s brother in law, BKS Iyengar (Iyengar Yoga), and Pattabhi Jois (Ashtanga). After all of these thousands of years of yoga changing, developing and growing, this is the kind of yoga that made it here. But, re

member, this is just one of the lineages of yoga that is practiced in India and the world over. Pretty cool, huh? If you’d like to know more about the other lineages in yoga, please view Alison Hinks’ Yoga Lineage Chart below!

How can knowing all of this help you out in your Hagoyah yoga practice? Know that all of our teachers come from the same lineage, so although their styles may differ, they all teach the same basic principles. Begin to notice where you see the similarities in their approach! Where can you find the influence of Pattabhi Jois’ Ashtanga? In Erran’s Vinyasa class? What about the breath focus of TKV Desikachar’s work? Perhaps in Sara’s Sweaty Serenity? The perfection of BKS Iynegar’s alignment? In Megan’s attention to detail in Glow with the Flow? Come explore the whole range of yogic experiences with us and find your expression of this ancient art. In the end, it is of little importance what kind of yoga you practice, as long as you DO practice!

“People often ask me if I teach asanas, and when I answer “yes”, they say “Oh, then you are a hatha yogi!”. And if I am talking about the Yoga Sutra, they say “Oh, you are a raja yogi!”. And if I say I recite the Vedas, the comment is: “Oh, so you are a mantra yogi!”. If I simply say that I practice yoga, they do not know what to make of me. Many people want to give everything and everyone a label.

Unfortunately, these classifications have become much too important and give the impression that there are fundamental differences between the various forms of yoga. But really, they are all dealing with the same thing, and are only looking at them from different perspectives. If we really follow one direction in yoga as far as we can go, then it will lead us along all paths of yoga.” TKV Desikachar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Breaking Up is hard to do!!!

The truth is all relationships are complicated and there isn’t a magic formula for how to compromise and how work things out.  Sometimes you need to simply listen to what your heart is telling you.

i spent 15+ years deeply LOVING Paul Mitchell.  During that time, i overlooked imperfections and compromised certain things because i truly believe all of us humans are trying our best, and the good outweighed the bad.  We can all relate to this scenario in our past intimate relationships, right!?!

An emotional week of sleepless nights has given me the opportunity to evaluate my self love, what i have built and what i stand for.  in any relationship, if you don’t feel the love is reciprocated, you are not respected, valued and important then maybe it is time for a shift.

it is with a heavy heart that i have ended my 15+ year relationship with Paul Mitchell.  i am pretty sure every large organization has its own drama and the recent drama involving Angus Mitchell is something i cannot stand behind or overlook anymore.

i feel sad for Paul Mitchell’s son, Angus.  He has grown up a very entitled, privileged, white male who seems to have a skewed sense of reality.  While working for the company, it was common knowledge that he was not necessarily a decent human based on very blatant destructive and somewhat “sleazy” behavior.  Behavior that is NOT aligned with the Paul Mitchell i fell in love with, nor aligned with my heart and vision.

He is not just the son of Paul Mitchell, he is the co-owner of the company.  All of the philanthropy behind Paul Mitchell doesn’t make this behavior okay.  At the end of it all, i don’t care how cool your Dad was, or what a saint your business partner (JP) is;  i want and need integrity behind who i support and do business with.

As a business owner, making this shift is a logistical nightmare.  i know in my heart i am making the right decision not just for myself, or my business but for humans and women all together.

Breaking up is always hard.  i still need a hug and feel like crying.

V-DAY

“Love thy neighbor as thyself.”

I should be more prepared, but inevitably every year it sneaks up on me.  It happened this year on January 5th.  I was leaving the grocery store and on my way out something caught my eye.  A flash of pink…upon closer examination it was a lot of pink, like someone had poured Pepto Bismol all over a display shelf.  There they were…boxes and bags of pink, red, and white candies.  Valentine’s Day.  I was still wishing others “happy new year” and the powers that be decided it was time for the next big holiday.  Upon registering what I had seen, my first reaction was son of a…eye roll…already?

My reaction isn’t a new one and I have a sneaking suspicion that it has less to do with rushing to the next holiday and more to do with my history with this day.  When I looked back I see that up until adulthood, my experiences were mostly positive.  Picking out valentines for my classmates, the party at school, coming home with a box full of cards and if I was lucky, some of the cards had candy attached to them!  But, fast forward to adulthood and it is riddled with some success, but also loneliness, and unmet expectations.    My expectation for the day has always revolved around someone else or the absence of someone else.  Do I have plans? Do I have a special someone? Will they come through? Will we have fun? Will they get me something I like? If I go deeper beyond expectations though, because let’s be honest I could choose to let those go, I was hinging my happiness on something or someone external to myself.  This is a shaky place to reside in life.  I have learned this the hard way over the past five or so years.  My whole life, my dad always was there for me with a card, flowers, and his never ending support when an inattentive boyfriend wasn’t or when I was single.  When he passed away, I was unsure how to feel important or loved on my own.  I had to learn that.  A year and a half ago, I broke off a long term relationship.  Whatever I didn’t learn about knowing and loving myself when I lost my dad, I had to face through this experience.  Who am I? What do I like to do? What makes me feel good?  Life throws us all types of challenges: death, divorce, break-ups.  It is inevitable.  But, if you know yourself and love yourself, life’s changes and challenges can be moved through more easily.  

There is a saying that you can only love someone else as much as you love yourself.  Well, it is true.  

After interviewing people and listening to thousands of stories, Brene Brownwas able to develop a definition of love.  She proposes, “…love is not something we give or get; it is something that we nurture and grow, a connection that can only be cultivated between two people when it exists within each one of them.  We can only love others as much as we love ourselves.” Brene Brown goes on to say that this definition was tough for her to accept because she didn’t want her level of self-love to “limit” how much she can love her family members.  Do you know why? Because loving others and accepting their limitations is much easier than doing that for ourselves. 

I always get resistance from my clients about this concept.  Love myself? Put myself first? Isn’t that selfish?  It is actually the opposite.  Here is why.  You have more to give if you give to yourself first.  On top of that, your relationships experience less pressure, less expectation if you are able to take care of yourself and supply yourself with your basic needs.  We get into trouble when we overly rely on others to make us feel loved, accepted, and worthy.  It sets up an unhealthy dynamic that might work at first, but ultimately, causes resentment, self-sabotage, and hurt among other things.  Louise Haystates that, “self-love is the most important gift we can give ourselves, because when we love who we are, we will not hurt ourselves, and we will not hurt anyone else.”  

My challenge to you is to set a goal this Valentine’s Day.  Vow to love yourself.  Think a loving thought or shut down a negative one.  Set a boundary.  Say no without supplying an excuse.  Sign up for an exercise or creative class.  Learn to get quiet or meditate.   Approach yourself with compassion, forgiveness and generosity on Valentine’s Day and every other day.  It will benefit you and your relationships will become easier, more peaceful, and loving.  If you can put these principles into practice for yourself, you will be more willing to approach others in your life this way.  

This year I have been able to make peace with Valentine’s Day.  When I really examined my thoughts and feelings after my initial reaction of dread, I felt okay about not knowing what Valentine’s Day or any other day will hold for me when it comes to love–from someone else that is.  I do know what it holds when it comes to loving myself.  The work I have done in this area has been challenging, but it continues to grow and no person, no bad date, no lack of a date can take that away from me.  And that is an empowering place to be.  

 

 

Annalisa is an education research psychologist, licensed professional counselor, and registered yoga teacher.  She offers counseling, life and professional coaching, and movement therapy using yoga practices.  Her philosophy is holistic and believes it is important to examine each part of life because she truly believes everything is connected when it concerns mental, emotional, and physical suffering and pain.  Annalisa feels truly grateful to be doing this work and believes her purpose in this life is to assist others on their journeys to self-discovery and healing. You can reach her via e-mail at amgramlich@yahoo.com or by phone at 816.916.9642

 

Resolutions

“You ought to write down your goals.  It serves as a guidepost and gives strength for purposeful action.”

Lailah Gifty Akita, Pearls of Wisdom: Great mind

Around this time of year there is so much written about making, keeping, and following through on resolutions.  I have made them for the past few years and have had some success with implementing them and having some small things show up.  For instance, I had travel as a goal for the past few years; however, during this time, the opportunity to take small more localized trips has materialized.  While my resolution to travel certainly included smaller trips, my hope was to be able to take a longer and more exotic vacation.

After writing my resolutions for 2016, I pulled out some old journals that contained the previous year’s resolutions.  Turns out that I have been making the same resolutions for a few years! A few I could cross off, but for the most part I desire the same things.  Initially, this shocked me and I immediately went into judgment mode.  Why can’t I get this done? Shouldn’t I be further along than this in these areas? After a few minutes of this I realized that being critical of myself was not going to get me where I wanted to be.  How can I turn this around? Then I had a thought, our resolutions or goals are lived through our daily actions, habits, and thoughts.  It is all well and good to set a goal of losing weight, but what actions can bring this about?  So, I developed the following exercise:

Write a list of your resolutions.  Be specific.  

For each resolution write ways in which that resolution can be lived.  What actions can you take on a daily basis? Get creative!

Examples: 

Lose 10 pounds-cook healthy meals at home, research gyms or memberships, work-out three times a week, take stairs at work, take short walks during breaks, plan meals, shop with a grocery list.

Travel locally and take longer vacation abroad-research weekend trips, save money weekly, join airfare watch service, sign-up for travel newsletter or group.

This process had an empowering effect on me because it gave me some tangible actions to focus on and to implement in my daily life. Surprisingly, I also discovered that I was already doing or had planned to do a few things that were in line with my new resolutions.  So, I had made more progress than I had originally thought with past resolutions and I’ve got a jump start on going even further this year!  Some goals take longer than others to accomplish, but getting creative with our daily actions and habits can be a more empowering path to living the life we desire.

I hope you find this exercise helpful and that you have a peaceful and prosperous 2016.  Happy New Year!

About Annalisa Gramlich

Annalisa is an education research psychologist, licensed professional counselor, and registered yoga teacher.  Annalisa offers counseling, life and professional coaching, and movement therapy using yoga practices.  Her philosophy is holistic and she believes it is important to examine each part of life because she truly believes everything is connected when it concerns mental, emotional, and physical suffering and pain.  Annalisa feels truly grateful to be doing this work and believes her purpose in this life is to assist others on their journeys to self-discovery and healing. You can reach Annalisa via e-mail at amgramlich@yahoo.com or by phone at 816.916.9642

How to get the BEST ponytail EVER!

1. Hair with texture works best!        

Try using Paul Mitchell Worked Up

It provides workable polymers, boost shine and reduces static!  

2. Knowing where to place your ponytail is KEY! 

Depending on whether you would rather show off you check bones (high ponytail!) or neck/jaw line (low ponytail!) will help you decide what ponytail is  Best for you!!

3. FULL Ponytials are where it’s at!

 

 

 

We all love the appearance of a nice thick ponytail. Using your Paul Mitchell Tease Brush start back combing at the crown of your ponytail, once you reached desired fullness, use the Paul Mitchell 413 to gently smooth over the backcomb. 

 

 

4. Don’t forget about the Smooth and Sleek ponytail!

These ponytails are timeless and classic. Start by gathering your hair in ponytail. Using the Paul Mitchell 427, iron out any bumps and/or flyaway. Finish off the Awapuhi Wild Ginger Finishing Spray for the perfect hair spray to secure any hair, resist humidity and add shine!

  

 

5. And finally, drum roll please….. The Messy Ponytail

Start by teasing hair before gathering it in a ponytail. I always like to enhance the “messy-ness” with Spray Wax because it gives the hair a bendable texture with a satin finish. Gather hair slowly, section by section without using a brush, helping ensure that messy ponytail. Using a brush will make it to sleek!  Once it is secure, if you want backcomb just a little more, feel free! 

 

Hope you enjoy these stylish new do’s! 🙂

Marula Oil

 

 

 

Would you be interested in 80% more shine, 80% reduction of split ends, and an overall 80% improved condition of your hair?  

We thought so!  Our BRAND new Marula Oil is NOW in!!

Packed full with powerful antioxidants and replenishing oleic acids this AMAZING formula is ideal for hair & skin, especially dry, dull, damaged, thick, coarse, unruly hair types!  Marula Oil has 50% more protective antioxidants that Argan Oil (this includes Moroccan oil!)

What’s great about our claims is that they are substantiated by a third party chemistry lab.  This means the results have been scientifically proven and documented to the point where they could hold up in court! We think that’s pretty cool! 

Our Marula fruit is wild harvested by African Women’s collectives who are educated on safe practices, provided traceability training and paid fair trade wages.  Our Marula Oil helps create a sustainable economy for women and their families.            

Just another reason we LOVE Paul Mitchell!!

 

 

 

 

The collection includes:

Rare Oil Replenishing Shampoo and Conditioner, Rare Oil Intensive Masque, Marula Oil Treatment, and Light Treatment for finer textures. 

Call now or click HERE to book your Special Wash House treatment and Style using our new Marula collection!  816.301.4411

 

 

 

Yoga? Pilates? What’s the difference?

What’s the difference between Yoga and Pilates? 

We have been wondering the same thing as well.  So, we asked our Friend, Lindsay from Precision Pilates to help us out with this.  

  • Both gain strength and flexibility.  

  • Both utilize a mind body connection.

  • Both work lungs to fullest capacity. 

  • Both are awesome. 

 Pilates began in the 1920’s by a man named, Joseph Pilates. Pilates is a non-impact exercise system that emphasizes alignment and body awareness.  It sculpts muscles, increases flexibility, core strength and optimal posture.  It has been rumored that, Joseph Pilates once practiced Yoga and from that he created a system called “Contrology.”

“Contrology is complete coordination of body, mind, and spirit. Through Contrology you first purposefully acquire complete control of your own body and then through proper repetition of exercises you progressively acquire that natural rhythm and coordination associated with all your subconscious activities. It develops the body uniformly, corrects wrong postures, restores physical vitality, invigorates the mind, and elevates the spirit.” ~Joseph Pilates

Yoga began over 5,000 years ago, and has evolved into various styles and traditions. It’s exact origin is uncertain, but has been a holistic practice deeply rooted in ancient Indian culture with a spiritual connection.  

Postures and breathing exercises (pranayama) were created to move energy through the body so one could be calm enough to sit in meditation. The classes are balanced in the postures and counter postures bringing balance to the entire body and mind.  Yoga postures, called asanas, are designed to tone, strengthen, and align the body, increase flexibility, and promote blood flow to all the organs, glands, and tissues, keeping all the body’s systems healthy and balanced.

Breathing

  • Pilates uses Lateral Breathing, where the breathe is concentrated in the rib cage, and the breathe doesn’t travel down to the waist.

  • Yoga breathing expands the abdominal cavity with deep “belly breaths.”  Yoga also incorporates several different kinds of breathing (pranayama) to balance, cleanse and energize the body.

There you have it.  They are both awesome! 

See for yourself through December 31st, 2014.  Enjoy YOGA AND PILATES at Hagoyah and our friends, Precision Pilates for only $100 a month for unlimited classes.  

Please, only one class per day.  🙂

Hyperpigmentation

Hyperpigmentation, it’s real, it sucks….it really sucks!  

What is hyperpigmentation?  It’s a grown-up thing/battle. 

Let’s say you have the opportunity to spend the majority of your 20’s living in Southern California, driving a convertible, and really enjoying the beach; you get into your late 20’s and all of the sudden you have a permanent spotty-tan on your face.  UGLY!

Technically Hyperpigmentation is “the darkening of an area of skin or nails caused by increased melanin.”

Preparing for battle, you have a few options.  

If you have loads of cash to spend on treatments, you can invest a few car-payments in peels, creams, lasers, etc.

If you are looking for something more affordable and less invasive, we have some weapons for you.  Please keep in mind, you didn’t get hyperpigmentation over night, and it will take real preserverance to win this battle. 

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Apple Cider Vinegar 

Use this as a toner DAILY.  We recommend diluting with water and using one that is organic, raw and/or unfiltered.  Braggs Apple Cider Vinegar and Trader Joe’s are great brands to choose.  Apple Cider Vinegar is also great for treating acne.

 

Lemon

Straight up lemon juice is a natural sort of bleach.  It is also great for acne as well.  Sometimes I like to just take a slice, rub in around my face, tingle and rinse.  You can also make a mask using lemon juice and honey.

 

Turmeric

Make a mask using milk, lemon juice and turmeric.  You can get away with just mixing with some water.  We don’t have any real measurements here, just make it into a paste, apply and leave on for about 10 minutes.  (You may get distracted and leave it on for too long and find your face looks like an Umpa-Lumpa.  Don’t worry, soap, water and some Apple Cider Vinegar will take care of it.)

Turmeric is an anti-inflamatory and a great skin brightener.  Indian men and women have used it for centuries as a wedding tradition to have beautiful glowing skin on their wedding day.   

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Prevention is key.  Lots of sunblock, fancy-sun-hats, and shade.  

Arming yourself up on the inside is a great idea too.  Lots of vitamin C and B-12 are great weapons.  Vitamin C helps with collagen production and B-12 regulates your pigment production.

Yoga Posture to Try: Natarajasana

 

Natarajasana

Lord of the Dance Pose

King Dancer/Standing Bow

 

Balancing and back-bending posture.

Stretches the shoulders and chest, thighs, groins, and abdomen

Strengthens the legs and ankles

 

 

  • Come into Tadasana, Mountain Pose.

  • Find your center and ground through the outer edges of your feet.

  • Extend Right Arm out, palm facing up, inside of your elbow facing out.  

  • Bend Right Leg and grab foot/ankle without tilting your wrist.

  • Align Knees 

  • Extend Left Arm straight up, palm facing right.

  • On an exhale, charge forward as you pick up your right leg.  Take your gaze towards your left hand.  

  • Hold this posture for 30+seconds